Arenga brevipes

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Arenga (ah-REN-gah)
brevipes (breh-VIH-pehz)
Arengabrevipes.jpg
PHILIPPINES: Palawan:: Palawan Prov. Aborlan municipality, Talakaigan
Scientific Classification
Genus: Arenga (ah-REN-gah)
Species:
brevipes (breh-VIH-pehz)
Synonyms
None set.
Native Continent
Asia
Asia.gif
Morphology
Habit: Clustering
Leaf type: Pinnate
Culture
Survivability index
Common names
Sugar Palm

Habitat and Distribution

Southeastern Asia - Indonesia. Rainforest. Primary rainforest, only rarely in secondary growth areas, at lower elevations.

Arenga brevipes is found in Borneo, and Sumatera.
PHILIPPINES: Palawan:: Palawan prov. Rizal municipality, barangay Ransang; coordinates of general area 8 40 48.00 N, 117 20 23.90 E, 26-Jun-07. Photo by Dr. Leonardo L.

Description

Arenga brevipes is a solitary-stemmed, evergreen palm. The unbranched stem is crowned by a rosette of large leaves. The plant is harvested from the wild for local use of its edible bud. All species in this genus have either recognized or potential ornamental value. Editing by edric.

Culture

The most tender, cold sensitive Arenga. Propagation: Seed - a deep root is formed before the seedling emerges above soil level, and so the seed should be sown in individual, deep containers. Pre-soak the seed for 24 hours in warm water before sowing. It can take 3 - 6 months or more before signs of growth are seen above soil level. Keep warm, sheltered, and moist. Cold Hardiness Zone: 10a

Comments and Curiosities

Edible Uses: Leaves - cooked. The apical bud, known as a 'palm heart' is eaten as a vegetable. Eating the bud causes the death of the tree since it is unable to form side shoots.

The fruits of most species in this genus are poisonous and are sometimes used criminally. The fleshy mesocarp of the fruits usually contains many oxalate crystals, making the flesh inedible. The stem is comprised of pith and is eaten. The leaves are used for thatching and wickerwork. The taller Arenga palms store large quantities of starch in their stem that are later converted into sugar to be translocated to the inflorescences. The sugar can be drawn off in the juice by tapping the peduncle and rachis of the male inflorescence. By far the most important sugar producer in the genus is Arenga pinnata, but other species are used similarly. The starch of the stem can also be harvested.

The taller Arenga palms store large quantities of starch in their stem that are later converted into sugar to be translocated to the inflorescences. The sugar can be drawn off in the juice by tapping the peduncle and rachis of the male inflorescence. By far the most important sugar producer in the genus is Arenga pinnata, but other species are used similarly. The starch of the stem can also be harvested

"very attractive but very rare in cultivation, this acaulescent (stemless or trunkless), clustering Bornean palm has beautiful deep, green shiny leaves with bright white undersides. The leaves erupt out of the ground and leaflets get progressively larger towards the tip of the leaf." (Geoff Stein)



External Links

References

Phonetic spelling of Latin names by edric.

Special thanks to Geoff Stein, (Palmbob) for his hundreds of photos.

Special thanks to Palmweb.org, Dr. John Dransfield, Dr. Bill Baker & team, for their volumes of information and photos.

Glossary of Palm Terms; Based on the glossary in Dransfield, J., N.W. Uhl, C.B. Asmussen-Lange, W.J. Baker, M.M. Harley & C.E. Lewis. 2008. Genera Palmarum - Evolution and Classification of the Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. All images copyright of the artists and photographers (see images for credits).


Many Special Thanks to Ed Vaile for his long hours of tireless editing and numerous contributions.

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