Coccothrinax argentea

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Coccothrinax (koh-koh-TRIH-naks)
argentea (are-JEN-teh-ah)
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In habitat. Photo-Rare Palm Seeds.com
Scientific Classification
Genus: Coccothrinax (koh-koh-TRIH-naks)
Species:
argentea (are-JEN-teh-ah)
Synonyms
None set.
Native Continent
America
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Morphology
Habit: Solitary rarely clustering.
Leaf type: Palmate
Culture
Survivability index
Common names
Hispaniola Silver Thatch Palm, Cana, Guano, Latanye marron, Latanye savanne, Broom palm, Hispaniolan silver palm, Silver thatch palm, Palmera plateada de La Hispaniola, Guanito, Guano de escoba.

Habitat and Distribution

Coccothrinax argentea is found in Hispaniola, Dominican Republic, and Haiti.
Coccothrinax argentea22.jpg
In its native range, it is found in open areas, or pine woodland on rocky calcareous soils, and also frequently in disturbed areas, where it spreads freely.

Description

Solitary, or rarely clustered, slender, smooth trunk to 10 m (33 ft.) tall. Its circular fan-shaped leaves, are dark green above, and beautifully silvery below, with an 8" diameter trunk, covered in a woven thatch of fibers. Fan leaves are 5 feet wide, and form a beautiful circular shape, with the leaflet segments being divided almost all the way to the hastula. Leaflets are rigid when young, and only slightly pendent when older, the undersides showing a silver coating.

Culture

Requires full sun, and a well drained soil. Does not mind drying out between waterings, once established. It adapts readily to cultivation in warm temperate, and tropical areas, and can take some coastal exposure. Prefers alkaline soil.

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Comments and Curiosities

Very young leaves are eaten as a vegetable. It is also used medicinally, by traditional healers to treat uterine fibroids, and hot flashes. This species is frequently confused with Coccothrinax argentata.

Commonly seen on the Island of Hispaniola, this pretty palm sports a solitary or rarely clustered, slender, smooth trunk to 10 m (33 ft.) tall. Its circular, fan-shaped leaves are dark green above and beautifully silvery below, most showy when they slowly move in a light breeze. In its native range it is found in open areas or pine woodland on rocky, calcareous soils, and also frequently in disturbed areas, where it spreads freely. It adapts readily to cultivation in warm temperate and tropical areas and can take some coastal exposure. (RPS.com), edric.


External Links

References

Phonetic spelling of Latin names by edric.

Special thanks to Geoff Stein, (Palmbob) for his hundreds of photos.

Special thanks to Palmweb.org, Dr. John Dransfield, Dr. Bill Baker & team, for their volumes of information and photos.

Glossary of Palm Terms; Based on the glossary in Dransfield, J., N.W. Uhl, C.B. Asmussen-Lange, W.J. Baker, M.M. Harley & C.E. Lewis. 2008. Genera Palmarum - Evolution and Classification of the Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. All images copyright of the artists and photographers (see images for credits).


Many Special Thanks to Ed Vaile for his long hours of tireless editing and numerous contributions.

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