Chamaedorea hooperiana

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Chamaedorea
(kahm-eh-doh-REH-ah)
hooperiana (hoo-per'-ee-ahn-ah)
Seeds 001z.jpg
Non-viable seeds.
Scientific Classification
Genus: Chamaedorea
(kahm-eh-doh-REH-ah)
Species:
hooperiana (hoo-per'-ee-ahn-ah)
Synonyms
None set.
Native Continent
America
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Morphology
Habit: Clustering
Leaf type: Pinnate
Culture
Survivability index
Common names
Hoopers palm, Maya palm, Swooping Bamboo palm.

Habitat and Distribution

Chamaedorea hooperiana is found in Rainforest of Veracruz Mexico.
In Louis Hooper's garden.
Dense, wet forest; alt. 1,000-1,500 m elevation.

Description

Trunk type: Clustering. Hight: To 4m (13'). Cluster spread: To 3m (10'). Leaf detail: Pinnately compound, diametrically opposed, somewhat widely spaced pinnae, erect new leafs, to become slightly drooping. Only recently discovered (by Don Hodel in 1992, during research for his definitive book on Chamaedoreas Chamaedorea Palms - The Species and Their Cultivation), this is said to be one of the most beautifull of the Chameadoreas. Tightly clustering species, with age, it can form a large group of slender, green stems that can reach 4 to 5 m (13 to 17 ft.) tall, each topped by a spreading crown of up to 7 flat, leathery, dark green leaves. It is a vigorous and very robust species that is easy to germinate and grow and more resistant than other clustering Chamaedorea to low humidity, mites and even light freezes due to its thick, leathery leaves. Editing by edric.

Habit: Cepitose (growing in tufts or clumps), clustering, new lateral shoots emerging from tops of old dried persistent basal sheaths, forming fairly dense clumps to 3-4 m across, erect, leaning with age, to 4-5 m tall. Stems: 2-2.5 cm in diam., green, ringed, often covered with old leaf bases, internodes to 15 cm long. Leaves: 5-7 per crown, erect-spreading, pinnate; sheath to 40-50 cm long, tightly clasping, obliquely open apically and there splitting deeply opposite petiole with age, rough-brown-margined, below this whitish and longitudinally striate-nerved, old sheaths persistent, drying brown, hard, durable, ± woody; petiole to 20-35 cm long, lime-green and grooved especially near base above, rounded and pale below; rachis to 0.8-1 m long, sharply angled and lime-green above, rounded below with a green or yellowish band extending onto sheath, attenuate apically; pinnae 20-26 on each side of rachis, lower and middle ones longest,

Culture

Requirements: Filtered light when young, partial shade when mature, consistently moist soil is best, but is somewhat drought tolerant, well drained position. Tolerating low light and neglect it is also a prime choice for indoors but it will perform best outdoors under some canopy in the warm temperate garden.

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Comments and Curiosities

Chamaedorea are dioecious, male, and female flowers, on separate plants.

Etymology: Honors Louis Hooper of La Habra, California from whose garden the type originated.

Only recently discovered (by Don Hodel in 1992, during research for his definitive book on Chamaedoreas Chamaedorea Palms - The Species and Their Cultivation), this is said to be one of the most beautifull of the Chameadoreas. Tightly clustering species, originally known only from a few enthusiasts collections before being rediscovered in 1989 in montane rainforest in Veracruz, Mexico, was named in honor of master palm collector Louis Hooper of California.


External Links

References

Phonetic spelling of Latin names by edric.

Special thanks to Geoff Stein, (Palmbob) for his hundreds of photos.

Special thanks to Palmweb.org, Dr. John Dransfield, Dr. Bill Baker & team, for their volumes of information and photos.

Glossary of Palm Terms; Based on the glossary in Dransfield, J., N.W. Uhl, C.B. Asmussen-Lange, W.J. Baker, M.M. Harley & C.E. Lewis. 2008. Genera Palmarum - Evolution and Classification of the Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. All images copyright of the artists and photographers (see images for credits).

Hodel, D.R.1992. Chamaedorea Palms, The Species and Their Cultivation. The International Palm Society.


Many Special Thanks to Ed Vaile for his long hours of tireless editing and numerous contributions.

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