Calyptronoma rivalis

From Palmpedia - Palm Grower's Guide
Jump to: navigation, search
Calyptronoma (kah-lip-tro-NO-mah)
rivalis (rihv-AH-liss)
7941350c-a1c5-4333-9d5f-19eca63ca1f1z.jpg
Florida. Photo by Dr. J. Roncal/Palmweb.
Scientific Classification
Genus: Calyptronoma (kah-lip-tro-NO-mah)
Species:
rivalis (rihv-AH-liss)
Synonyms
Calyptronoma quisqueyana, Cocops rivalis, Calyptrogyne rivalis, Calyptrogyne quisqueyana
Native Continent
America
America.gif
Morphology
Habit: Solitary
Leaf type: Pinnate
Culture
Survivability index
Common names
Palma de Manaca, Palma Manaca, Puerto Rican manac, manac palm, manacla, palmilla (Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic); palm a vin (Haiti). (S. Zona. 1995)/Palmweb.

Habitat and Distribution

Calyptronoma rivalis is found in Dominican Republic, Haiti, Puerto Rico. Native to stream
Florida. Photo by Dr. J. Roncal/Palmweb.
banks and arroyos in the hills and mountains of Hispaniola and western Puerto Rico. (S. Zona. 1995)/Palmweb.

All three natural populations are located in the semi-evergreen, limestone forests of northwestern Puerto Rico. These forests are at elevations of 100 to 150 meters. The habitat areas are wet and humid, and the natural populations are found in level or almost level areas around stream banks. These palm trees will grow in sun or shade. In the upper part of the Rio Camuy, some individuals are located at the bottom of deep canyons.

RANGE AND POPULATION LEVEL: Until 1980, this palm tree was known from only one site, Quebrada Collazo, a small stream near San Sebastian in northwestern Puerto Rico. Only 44 individuals remain there. Two additional populations have been discovered within the last decade; one site, along the Camuy River, was discovered in 1980. The other site, along the Guajataca River, was found later. The combined population at these two sites is 220 individuals. In addition, two new populations have been established from palm tree seedlings, one in the Puerto Rican Department of Natural Resources' Rio Abajo Commonwealth Forest and the other at Camp Guajataca, owned by the Boy Scouts.

Description

Palma de manaca is a palm tree reaching about 30 to 40 feet (8 to 10 meters) in height. Its trunk is smooth and may grow to 6 to 10 inches (13 to 25 centimeters) in diameter. Leaf: , 12 to 14 spineless, feather-shaped leaves, up to 12 feet long with a 2-foot long leaf stalk and a 2-foot long sheath. Trunk: Smooth, 6 to 10 inches (13 to 25 centimeters) in diameter. Flower: Its large flowers are clustered, branched, and drooping. They are arranged in triads of two males and one female. Fruit: reddish when ripe. 0.25 inch wide (6 mm.). All of the fruits mature at the same time and fall with the persistent flower parts still attached to the base. imperfectly round. The palm tree has spineless, feather-shaped leaves which can reach up to 12 feet long with a 2-foot long leaf stalk and a 2-foot long sheath. Its large flowers are clustered, branched, and drooping. Borne on sunken pits, these flowers are arranged in triads of two males and one female. The fruits, less than one-quarter-inch wide, are imperfectly round and reddish when ripe. Fruit: 0.25 inch wide (6 mm.). All of the fruits mature at the same time and fall with the persistent flower parts still attached to the base. imperfectly round. Editing by edric.



Culture

Water Requirements: Abundant water. Sun Requirements: Full sun or light shade.

Comments and Curiosities


External Links

References

Phonetic spelling of Latin names by edric.

Special thanks to Geoff Stein, (Palmbob) for his hundreds of photos.

Special thanks to Palmweb.org, Dr. John Dransfield, Dr. Bill Baker & team, for their volumes of information and photos.

Glossary of Palm Terms; Based on the glossary in Dransfield, J., N.W. Uhl, C.B. Asmussen-Lange, W.J. Baker, M.M. Harley & C.E. Lewis. 2008. Genera Palmarum - Evolution and Classification of the Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. All images copyright of the artists and photographers (see images for credits).

Zona, S.1995. A Revision of Calyptronoma (Arecaceae). Principes 39: 140-151.


Many Special Thanks to Ed Vaile for his long hours of tireless editing and numerous contributions.

Banner1B
Back to Palm Encyclopedia