Allagoptera campestris

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Allagoptera (ahl-lah-gohp-TEH-rah)
campestris (kahm-PEHS-trihs)
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Jardim Botânico, Brasília, Brasil. Photo by Mauricio Mercadante
Scientific Classification
Genus: Allagoptera (ahl-lah-gohp-TEH-rah)
Species:
campestris (kahm-PEHS-trihs)
Synonyms
None set.
Native Continent
America
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Morphology
Habit: Solitary
Leaf type: Pinnate
Culture
Survivability index
Common names
Brazil: ariri, buri, buri do campo, côco de guriri , côco de vassoura, coquinha, coqueiro pissandó, imburi, licuri, ouricuri, pissandó, pissandú, chamada de Camburí, Palmeirinha do campo, Argentina: Pindocito.

Habitat and Distribution

Allagoptera campestris is found in Argentina Northeast, Brazil Northeast, Brazil
Nong Nooch Tropical Gardens, Thailand.
South, Brazil Southeast, Brazil West-Central, Paraguay. This species occurs at 600-1500 m. It grows in the cerrado of central Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina, especially in open areas of campos sujos, cerrados with forest islands, campos rupestres, and campos gerais. The habitats of Allagoptera campestris include sandy to rocky slopes and tops of cerrado hills. It is also found in transitional areas between the caatinga and mata de cipó vegetation.

Description

In some habitats, A. campestris grows mixed with Acrocomia aculeata and Syagrus romanzoffiana, totally camouflaged with the tall grass and completely invisible. Fruits are typical of all Allagoptera species, occurring in a 'spatha' and are not edible. The seeds are small and germinate easy and quickly when they are fresh. The subterranean trunk is short and sometimes branched. The leaves are pinnate and similar to S. romanzoffianum, except that they are grey below and are held spread out on the ground. This palm grows occasionally in Argentina and is endangered in this country. The latitude 27° S is, approximately, the southern limit of this species. (Jose A Grassia)

A stemless (acaulescent), solitary, but subterranean, giving it the appearance of clustering, dwarf palm, native to savanna vegetation in southern central Brazil, easternmost Paraguay and adjoining Argentina, where it grows to altitudes of 1500 m (4900 ft.). While generally similar to the other species in the genus, with plumose, arching leaves that are dark green above and densely silvery below, A. campestris is most easily distinguished by its stiff--not curly--leaflets. Due to its inland habitat at some altitude, it is by far the hardiest of the Allagoptera and will take some cold and moderate freezes. It will grow happily in warm temperate as well as in many tropical climates and prfers a place in full sun. This palm grows in sandy and triturate stones soils, rich in iron, exposed to very hot temperatures in summer, and occasional freezes in winter. This is a very small palm, with a clustering habit, and a subterranean trunk. The leaves look like a very small Syagrus romanzoffiana with grey scales below, but with the typical Allagoptera inflorescence and fruits. (Mónica Moraes)/Palmweb. Editing by edric.

Culture

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A very well drained, sandy mix, in full sun. Can take very harsh conditions. Seeds germinate easily when fresh. It prefers sandy and stony soils, full sun, and it tolerates temperatures down to -4° C/ 26 F.

Comments and Curiosities

Etymology: The name Buri comes from the Tupi (the indigenous) and means "little leaf".

Phenology: Fruits all year around, but only ripen with warm temperatures and sun. Begins to bear fruit within 6 to Seven years after planting.

Conservation: It is endangered in habitat (it is very rare, even in its native country of Argentina), and rarely cultivated. Requires very well drained, sandy mix, in full sun. Can take very harsh conditions. Seeds germinate easily.

Uses: The premature fruits are edible. The leaves are utilized as forage and for brooms.

This is a tillering palm, it exhibits saxophone style root growth (it has a heel), keep top third of heel above soil elevation!

A stemless dwarf palm native to savanna vegetation in southern central Brazil, easternmost Paraguay and adjoining Argentina, where it grows to altitudes of 1500 m (4900 ft.). While generally similar to the other species in the genus, with plumose, arching leaves that are dark green above and densely silvery below, A. campestris is most easily distinguished by its stiff--not curly--leaflets. Due to its inland habitat at some altitude, it is by far the hardiest of the Allagoptera and will take some cold and moderate freezes. (RPS.com)


External Links

References

Phonetic spelling of Latin names by edric.

Special thanks to Geoff Stein, (Palmbob) for his hundreds of photos.

Special thanks to Palmweb.org, Dr. John Dransfield, Dr. Bill Baker & team, for their volumes of information and photos.

Glossary of Palm Terms; Based on the glossary in Dransfield, J., N.W. Uhl, C.B. Asmussen-Lange, W.J. Baker, M.M. Harley & C.E. Lewis. 2008. Genera Palmarum - Evolution and Classification of the Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. All images copyright of the artists and photographers (see images for credits).

Mónica Moraes. Flora Neotropica, monograph 73, Allagoptera. The New York Botanical Garden.


Many Special Thanks to Ed Vaile for his long hours of tireless editing and numerous contributions.

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